The Viking Ship Museum in Oslo

The Viking Ship Museum offers to the visitors a glimpse into the life of the fearsome Vikings. It displays three incredible Viking ships, including the two best well-preserved Viking ships ever found, the Oseberg ship and the Gokstad ship. The three ships were used as graves. The ship burial was a common custom among the Viking Age Norsemen. The museum also displays the grave offerings found in the ships.

The museum is located on the Bygdøy Peninsula. Besides the Viking Ship Museum, there are other interesting museums in Bygdøy such as the Kon-Tiki Museum, the Fram Museum, the Norwegian Maritime Museum and the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History.

The Bygdøy Peninsula is a quiet residential area. You can easily spend the whole day there, taking a pleasant walk around the neighborhood and visiting the museums. The best way to get there is by taking the shuttle boat that departs from the Oslo harbor every 30 minutes. For easier access the boat makes two stops:
1 – Dronningen:  Closer to the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History (Folk Museum), Viking Ship Museum and Oscarshall.
2 – Bygdøynes: Closer to the Kon-Tiki Museum, Fram Museum, and Norwegian Maritime Museum.

For more information go to the Viking Ship Museum website.

The Viking Ship Museum

The Viking Ship Museum

The mysterious Oseberg ship was discovered in a large burial mound at the Oseberg farm. It is still unknown for whom the burial mound was made. Two female human skeletons were found inside the ship along with an incredible number of goods. The beautiful decoration of the ship and the number of burial gifts suggests that the two women had a very high status. Inside the ship were found tapestries, silk, clothes, shoes and combs, ship’s equipment, kitchen equipment, farm equipment, three ornate sleds and a working sled, a wagon, five carved animal heads, five beds, two tents, fifteen horses, six dogs and two small cows.

The Oseberg Ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Oseberg Ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Oseberg Ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Oseberg Ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Gokstad ship was found in a burial mound at the Gokstad farm. It was a warship built to carry a crew of 40 to 70 men. It was built during the reign of the King Harald Fairhair. A skeleton of an unknown male was found inside the ship. The ship was plundered, but the artifacts that survived are on display in this museum.

The Gokstad ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Gokstad ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Gokstad ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Gokstad ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Tune ship is the least preserved ship in the museum. It was found in the village of Tune. Most of the artifacts found inside the ship were either damaged or robbed. The ship itself was damaged greatly during the excavations. This ship is smaller than the other two and it could travel faster.

The Tune ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Tune ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Tune ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Tune ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Tune ship at the Viking Ship Museum

The Tune ship at the Viking Ship Museum

Findings of the Tune ship

Findings of the Tune ship

Collections of objects from the Viking era

Collections of objects from the Viking era

Carved wooden wagon from the Oseberg ship

Carved wooden wagon from the Oseberg ship

By | 2017-09-11T00:14:42+00:00 August 22nd, 2015|Categories: Oslo|Tags: , , , , |1 Comment

One Comment

  1. Polaco September 11, 2015 at 12:49 pm - Reply

    Have been to all of those cities seravel times. You’re going to be sorely disappointed if you think everyone is blonde and tall and fit. All of my Swedish friends have dark hair and are shorter than me (I’m 5’7) and let’s just say, many Swedes are well-fed. Also, Sweden and Norway have a HUGE influx of immigrants from Africa and the middle east, you’re just as likely to find darker skinned, dark haired people. While you can approach theses cities in the same way as you would an American city, don’t expect American hospitality and friendliness. Scandinavians are sometimes not very open to people they don’t know with possibly the exception being Iceland. In Stockholm, make sure to visit the Gamla Stan neighborhood. The subway system is very crowded but clean. In Copenhagen, check out Tivoli Gardens. It’s lovely to walk around and very old. There is a great restaurant at Tivoli called Grf8ften that is very good. Tivoli opens again in mid-April. Also in Denmark, if you’re the type that likes cultural things, make sure to see the Glyptoteket museum, it’s wonderful. There are a lot of things to do in CPH, but April in Scandinavia is still pretty cold, so dress for winter. Also, the bike culture in Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Stockholm is fierce. There are more bikes than cars. Don’t expect to rent a car to get around, familiarize yourself with the public transport in each town. Driving is a nightmare (trust me, I’ve done it) and parking is VERY expensive, hard to find and a pain. Scandinavia is the most expensive place you could have chosen to visit so plan to pay about double for anything you buy here, triple if it’s clothing. Everything is heavily taxed and very expensive, even McDonald’s.

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